Wolfenstein: The New Order (Review)

WTNOAs I have mentioned before, I’ve recently been drawn towards the moral absolutes of games about fighting demonic Nazis. Having played Return to Castle Wolfenstein, I naturally wanted to progress on to the next game in the main series – 2009’s Wolfenstein.

However, that one’s quite hard to get a hold of, and I am bad at patience. So instead, this is a review of the next one on: Wolfenstein: The New Order. To avoid typing that again and again, I’m just going to refer to it from here on out as Wolfenstein.

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The Chalk Man – C. J. Tudor (Review)

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As a child, Eddie Munster found most of a body. He and his friends followed mysterious chalk markings to the corpse of a girl, dismembered in the woods. No one ever found her head.

As an adult, Ed still lives in the same town. He teaches now, and drinks a lot. He tries not to think too much about the past, about the murdered girl or the man who was blamed.

But old memories keep resurfacing, and new chalk marks start to appear. Maybe what happened all those years ago isn’t really over, and the accepted story isn’t the whole truth.  Continue reading “The Chalk Man – C. J. Tudor (Review)”

The Strategist – Gerrard Cowan (Review)

The Machinery is broken, and the old order cannot hold. Its downfall has let back into the world many creatures once forbidden, and they have begun to build strongholds and armies for the struggle to come. Charls Brandione, a former general, Aranfal, a secret policeman, and Canning, a merchant-turned-mandarin-turned-something-else-entirely, must learn what they can about this brave new world. Most of all, they must learn how to stay alive in it.

Perhaps I can best give the feel of The Strategist by  quoting a line of dialogue that comes up a lot: “What is this place?” Continue reading “The Strategist – Gerrard Cowan (Review)”

Return to Castle Wolfenstein (2001) – Review

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Lately, I have been feeling nostalgic and desirous of black-and-white morality. Naturally, I have gravitated towards media involving occult Nazis.

Occult Nazis have a long and storied history as enemies in video games, and the Wolfenstein series is definitely at the forefront of that. Not having played the series before, I went back to the first one that could be described as vaguely modern: Return to Castle Wolfenstein.
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Ladycastle – Delilah Dawson & Ashley A. Woods (Review)

A paradise of green hills and beautiful women; the little town full of bustle and work; the sound of music in the air. And then a man arrives, as they are wont to do, bringing panic and disruption in his wake.

Ladycastle is a graphic novel all about how much trouble men cause: a refreshingly honest take on the classic fairytales. The Disney-style musical number that introduces the characters is a blunt account, in their own words, of how bad things are in the kingdom of men. I’ve got a lot of time for this approach. Continue reading “Ladycastle – Delilah Dawson & Ashley A. Woods (Review)”

Take me There – Julie Cannon (Review)

51LLeTSHisL._SY346_Sloan and Adrienne used to have a passionate relationship. But that was years ago, and their lives have diverged radically. Sloan poured all of her energy into her legal career and a string of meaningless flings; Adrienne went to art school, got married, had a child.

When Adrienne, now widowed, faces Sloan across the conference table, it brings up a lot of buried feelings. She and Sloan have to navigate a complicated business deal while also dealing with their complicated past and intense attraction to each other.
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It (1990) – Review

It_1990_Promotional_PosterI think most people are probably familiar with the basic idea of It, in the same way that everyone understands generally how Freddy Krueger or Jason Voorhees operates. Essentially, the town of Derry is home to a fear-eating monster that often disguises itself as a clown.

The story is split over two time periods – one in which a group of outcast children are hunted by the monster, and one years later in which the outcast children, now adults, return to Derry to deal with the monster again. As you might imagine, it’s quite a long book.

The 1990 miniseries was an attempt to take the massive and complex story of It and distill it down to a three-hour running time. It was reasonably successful.

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