Law-Abiding Citizen (2009) – Review

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After criminals kill his family and the justice system fails him, an inventor (Gerard Butler) starts taking the law into his own hands. Though he’s quickly imprisoned, the killings don’t stop. The prosecutor (Jamie Foxx) who let him down when his family was murdered is the only person who might be able to stop the slaughter.  Continue reading “Law-Abiding Citizen (2009) – Review”

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Goodfellas (1990) – Review

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Everyone knows what a mobster looks like. We know how they talk, how they dress, how they relate to each other. We know about their secret rituals, and about the iron rules they live by.

We know about these because of the media. The Godfather, The Sopranos, Guys and Dolls. Arguably, the media created the Mafia aesthetic as much as it portrayed it. I read once, though I can sadly no longer find a source, that the FBI’s job got much easier after The Godfather was released, because all of the gangsters started dressing like the characters.

Goodfellas is a cinematic classic, and it’s definitely one of the most important films for cementing the cultural idea of how the mob looks and acts. I’ve only just got around to watching it.  Continue reading “Goodfellas (1990) – Review”

Escape Plan (2013) – Review

escape_planRay Breslin (Sylvester Stallone) wrote the book on breaking out of prisons. That’s not a metaphor, as almost every character in this film has read the book, and keeps a copy of it nearby for dramatic effect.

Ray makes his living by stress-testing maximum security prisons. Disguised as a convict, Ray is inserted into prisons so that he can break his way out, and then identify the security flaws. He’s broken out of every prison he’s ever been inside, and he’s confident in his abilities.

When a secret black-ops prison needs testing, they come to Ray. And they come prepared to pay a large amount of money for his services, particularly if he overlooks normal security procedures. As you might imagine, it turns out that this prison is both more secure and more evil than other prisons, and now he has to break out for real.

Continue reading “Escape Plan (2013) – Review”

The Innocent Wife – Amy Lloyd (Review)

32187685Dennis Danson is a killer. A cruel, sadistic monster who needs to be locked away. He’s in prison for the murder of one girl, and everyone knows he killed several others. Everyone except Samantha.

Samantha (Sam) knows he’s innocent. He’s kind, and caring and understanding; there’s no way he could be the monster that everyone thinks he is. She writes him letter after letter, falling in love and feeling secure for the first time. When he proposes, she travels to America to marry him in prison. They never touch.
Continue reading “The Innocent Wife – Amy Lloyd (Review)”

John Wick (2014) – Review

1200x630bbJohn Wick is a grieving widower who also happens to be a deadly, albeit retired, assassin. When gangsters kill his dog, a final present from his dead wife, he un-retires himself to ensure that they understand the grievous nature of their error.  Continue reading “John Wick (2014) – Review”

Bright (2017) – Review

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Two thousand years after the fall of the Dark Lord, America still bears the scars of the conflict. Elves are the rich and powerful elite, living in secure, gated communities in the human cities. And orcs are the underclass – distrusted and feared, stereotyped (often accurately) as brutal gang members.

Ward (Will Smith) is the cop who’s unlucky enough to get partnered with the LAPD’s newest diversity hire: Jakoby, the first orc on the Force. Together, they have to deal with racism, corruption, and the constant threat of death. Also, someone might be trying to bring the Dark Lord back.

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The Chalk Man – C. J. Tudor (Review)

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As a child, Eddie Munster found most of a body. He and his friends followed mysterious chalk markings to the corpse of a girl, dismembered in the woods. No one ever found her head.

As an adult, Ed still lives in the same town. He teaches now, and drinks a lot. He tries not to think too much about the past, about the murdered girl or the man who was blamed.

But old memories keep resurfacing, and new chalk marks start to appear. Maybe what happened all those years ago isn’t really over, and the accepted story isn’t the whole truth.  Continue reading “The Chalk Man – C. J. Tudor (Review)”