Red Sister – Mark Lawrence (Review)

red sister.jpgAs everyone knows, there are four types of nun: prayer nuns, stealth nuns, magic nuns, and murder nuns. The convent of Sweet Mercy trains them all.

Nona Grey – a child steeped in blood almost since birth – is saved from the gallows and taken to the convent. For the first time ever, she has friends, and enough to eat. She learns to read and fight and use her talents to their fullness. Outside the walls, as the world grows colder, her enemies gather and strengthen.
Continue reading “Red Sister – Mark Lawrence (Review)”

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Love’s Verdict – Carsen Taite (Review)

Loves verdictTwo exceptional, ambitious, but very different,  lawyers are assigned to work on the same case. Whichever one most distinguishes herself will get the only available partnership place.

As they work to defend one of their firm’s most valuable clients from a murder charge, they face a different and unexpected problem: the growing attraction between them.  Continue reading “Love’s Verdict – Carsen Taite (Review)”

Push Me Pull Me – Amanda Rhodes (Review)

pmpm

Mallory is not the best at life. She’s frequently late to work and struggles with face-to-face interaction, preferring to spend her time online. These are significant problems for a rental agent.

With her boss running out of patience, Mallory has to do everything she can to impress her latest client – the beautiful, sophisticated Corinne. As she summons previously-untouched reserves of professionalism, Mallory begins to suspect that a beautiful rental property is not the only thing Corinne has her eye on.  Continue reading “Push Me Pull Me – Amanda Rhodes (Review)”

Murder Most Unladylike – Robin Stevens (Review)

murder most unladylikeWhen Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong set up their very own secret detective agency at Deepdean School for Girls, they struggle to find any truly exciting mysteries to investigate. (Unless you count the case of Lavinia’s missing tie. Which they don’t.)

Then Hazel discovers the Science Mistress, Miss Bell, lying dead in the Gym. She assumes it was a terrible accident – but when she and Daisy return five minutes later, the body has disappeared. Now Hazel and Daisy not only have a murder to solve: they have to prove one happened in the first place. Continue reading “Murder Most Unladylike – Robin Stevens (Review)”

Top Ten Tuesday – Fictional real places

Top Ten Tuesday“Top Ten Tuesday” is a feature started by “The Broke and the Bookish”,  though now hosted by some artsy reader girl in which people list their top ten books that match some given criterion. It changes every week, and happens on a Tuesday. Lots (a frankly ridiculous number) of bloggers take part.

This week, the theme is “books that take place in another country”. The vast majority of books I read take place in other countries, and often other worlds, so that seemed a little too easy. Instead, I’m listing fictional real places. these are places that have been inserted seamlessly into the real world – places that might exist, as long as nobody actually goes and looks. Continue reading “Top Ten Tuesday – Fictional real places”

The Innocent Wife – Amy Lloyd (Review)

32187685Dennis Danson is a killer. A cruel, sadistic monster who needs to be locked away. He’s in prison for the murder of one girl, and everyone knows he killed several others. Everyone except Samantha.

Samantha (Sam) knows he’s innocent. He’s kind, and caring and understanding; there’s no way he could be the monster that everyone thinks he is. She writes him letter after letter, falling in love and feeling secure for the first time. When he proposes, she travels to America to marry him in prison. They never touch.
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Shadow of the Savernake – Jayne Hackett (Review)

shadow of the savernake

Aborologist Florence Brock steps into the hollow of an ancient tree and awakes transported several hundred years into England’s past. Thrust into a land at war, where her skills count for nothing and her life even less, Florence has to forget everything she once knew and become something more. 
Her fate is entwined with Nat Haslet, a savvy and resourceful soldier marooned beyond his own time, desperate to get back home. Nat has learned what it is to survive in this broken land, doing what he must to stay alive.
Their incursion in the time-line alerts both friend and foe. There are those who would help them – The Taxanes – a secretive order as ancient as the trees themselves, who protect the time-line from ripples that were never meant to be. And there are those who would seek to use Florence’s knowledge for a far darker purpose, twisting history to their own malevolent ends.
Now, Florence and Nat must forge an understanding if they are to navigate the treachery of England’s lost and brutal past, before time itself runs out.” Continue reading “Shadow of the Savernake – Jayne Hackett (Review)”