Love’s Verdict – Carsen Taite (Review)

Loves verdictTwo exceptional, ambitious, but very different,  lawyers are assigned to work on the same case. Whichever one most distinguishes herself will get the only available partnership place.

As they work to defend one of their firm’s most valuable clients from a murder charge, they face a different and unexpected problem: the growing attraction between them.  Continue reading “Love’s Verdict – Carsen Taite (Review)”

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Mission: Impossible – from I to Fallout

Mission Impossible Fallout book reviewI would like to begin with an apology. Right now, there are 7 drafts sitting in my review folder. I have indie films to analyze, antique anthropology to bring back into the light, and a hatchet job on Mamma Mia 2 which consumes me with evil joy.

But nothing – nothing – can come before Mission: Impossible. I am totally biased on this topic. I have been nurturing weird fan theories for years, so as well as a review, you are going to have to sit through the internet equivalent of someone sitting at a bar emanating weird smells and muttering to themselves.

I’m probably going to get kicked off the blog for this. Thanks for the excuse to rewatch the series. Continue reading “Mission: Impossible – from I to Fallout”

Law-Abiding Citizen (2009) – Review

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After criminals kill his family and the justice system fails him, an inventor (Gerard Butler) starts taking the law into his own hands. Though he’s quickly imprisoned, the killings don’t stop. The prosecutor (Jamie Foxx) who let him down when his family was murdered is the only person who might be able to stop the slaughter.  Continue reading “Law-Abiding Citizen (2009) – Review”

Blood Summit – Robert Pimm (Review)

Politics is a funny thing. It can feel like another dimension: a strange, rarefied place where people really use phrases like “strong and stable” or “Make America Great Again”. The same cloth-eared impresarios are also obsessed with novelty. New initiatives, elections, treaties, laws and manifestos are constantly being announced.

But in practice, change is rare – and that’s rather unfortunate, because despite its lofty airs, politics affects us all. In practice, people can get hurt. Continue reading “Blood Summit – Robert Pimm (Review)”

The Innocent Wife – Amy Lloyd (Review)

32187685Dennis Danson is a killer. A cruel, sadistic monster who needs to be locked away. He’s in prison for the murder of one girl, and everyone knows he killed several others. Everyone except Samantha.

Samantha (Sam) knows he’s innocent. He’s kind, and caring and understanding; there’s no way he could be the monster that everyone thinks he is. She writes him letter after letter, falling in love and feeling secure for the first time. When he proposes, she travels to America to marry him in prison. They never touch.
Continue reading “The Innocent Wife – Amy Lloyd (Review)”

John Wick (2014) – Review

1200x630bbJohn Wick is a grieving widower who also happens to be a deadly, albeit retired, assassin. When gangsters kill his dog, a final present from his dead wife, he un-retires himself to ensure that they understand the grievous nature of their error.  Continue reading “John Wick (2014) – Review”

Falcó – Arturo Pérez-Reverte (Review)

9788420419688.jpgA good-looking gent in a soft hat leans back in his seat as the train puffs down the track to Barcelona. When the engine pauses in Narbonne, he stubs out his cigarette and walks quickly out on to the platform. Minutes later, a beautiful woman will be found dead.

Yes, we are in the chain-smoking, gun-toting, heart-breaking 1930s. The clouds are gathering over northern Europe, but in Spain, the storm has already broken. The eponymous hero of Arturo Pérez-Reverte’s thriller, the mysterious Falcó, is making the best of the situation by offering his sinister talents to Franco’s secret service. Continue reading “Falcó – Arturo Pérez-Reverte (Review)”